On This Day In Judy Garland’s Life And Career – April 25

Posted by

On this day…

For more details and more photos, check out The Judy Room’s Facebook Page where daily “on this day” updates are posted chronicling Judy Garland’s incredibly rich and busy life!


Judy Garland

Judy Garland - Smilin' Through - The Singles CollectionApril 25, 1938:  Judy recorded two singles for Decca Records at the label’s studios in Hollywood, California: “Cry, Baby, Cry” and “Sleep My Baby Sleep” both released on Decca Single #1796 in May of 1938.  Spike Jones played the drums for this session.  For details (and tons of photos) of Judy’s Decca recordings, check out The Judy Garland online Discography’s Decca Records pages at http://www.thejudyroom.com/decca.html.

The alternate (“B” take), of “Cry, Baby, Cry” was mistakenly issued instead of the “A” take when Decca released its two-LP set “Collector’s Items” in 1973:  http://thejudyroom.com/decca/collectors.html

The “A” take did not make its CD debut until the fantastic 2011 JSP Records 4-CD release “Smilin’ Through – The Singles Collection – 1936-1947”:
http://thejudyroom.com/decca/smilinthrough.html


 

April 25, 1949:  Recording session at MGM for Annie Get Your Gun.  Judy pre-recorded “I’m An Indian, Too.”  She arrived at 1:15 p.m. and finished the song in fifty-five minutes, dismissed at 2:10 p.m.

The pre-recording stayed in the MGM vaults (aside from some poor-sounding bootleg LPs in the 1960s and 70s) until it premiered on the 1994 CD soundtrack to “That’s Entertainment! III” in which it was a featured segment.

Check out The Judy Room’s Filmography Pages on Annie Get Your Gun at http://www.thejudyroom.com/annie.html.


 

April-25,-1950-(for-April-24)-MOCAMBO-Star_Tribune-(Minneapolis)April 25, 1950:  Will Jones’ column “After last Night” reported on his attending one of the weekly Charleston contests at the Mocambo nightclub.  The indication is that he went the night before this column came out which would have been Monday, April 24th.  This is the night that these wonderful photos of Judy and Lucy dancing together were taken.  Years later Lucy would proclaim that Judy was “the funniest woman in Hollywood.”

On that night, Judy was there as were several other stars.  It was quite the night with Judy, Lucille Ball, Maria Montez, Janet Leigh, and Chico Marx acting judges for the contest.  Jones noted:  Judy Garland, wearing fuzzy cap on back of head, strapless evening gown, came in with party.  They got past rope immediately, sat at table where they couldn’t see band.  After a few minutes were moved to better ringside table … [Harry] Cocker [columnist for the LA Examiner and emcee for the night] asked Miss Ball, Miss Garland to do sister act.  Both stars looked surprised, covered faces with hands, then got up, danced Charleston together.  Much applause and whistling.  Chico played piano (“It Happened on the Beach at Bali Bali”). 

All the couples received a bottle of Scotch which, of course, probably made it an even more eventful night.  The photos below of Judy with husband Vincente Minnelli was also taken at the Mocambo on this night.



April-25,-1951-JUDY-AND-BING-IN-FILM-The_Brooklyn_Daily_Eagle

April 25, 1951:  Judy’s colossal success at the London Palladium in 1951 followed by even greater success at New York’s Palace Theatre in 1951/52 prompted Hollywood to consider her for several film roles that never materialized, listed below.  The on-screen teaming of Judy with Bing Crosby has always been one of the major “missed opportunities” of Judy’s career.  She and Bing were magic together on the Decca Records singles they recorded and the many wonderful radio appearances.  Below is a listing of some of the projects Judy was allegedly considered for during this time.  More details about all of the film projects that Judy was considered can be found at The Judy Room’s “Films That Got Away” pages.

Judy Garland and Bing Crosby 1980s LPJust For You (aka Famous) (with Bing Crosby) – The film was made with Crosby and Jane Wyman in 1952.

Meet Me In New York – Sally Benson’s sequel to Meet Me In St. Louis. It’s speculated that this is the same as her 1952 screenplay titled “14 Fifth Avenue”

A film biography of Buddy DeSylva (with Bing Crosby)

Paramount wanted Judy to co-star with Bing Crosby and “Hopalong Cassidy” in a western.

Kiss Me Kate – made my MGM in 1953.

The Jane Froman Story – Eventually released in 1953 as With A Song In My Heart starring Susan Hayward

The Stubborn Wood (1951/1953) – Actor Paul Henried wanted to make this film, based on the 1948 Emily Harvin novel about a husband who has his wife put in an insane asylum just to get her out of his life.  That would have been interesting.


 

April 25, 1963, & April 25, 1965:  Two reviews of then-recent Judy Garland compilation LPs from MGM Records.  Every few years the label released new compilations of songs from Judy’s films that were originally released by MGM Records in the late 40s and 1950.

The Judy Garland Story vol 2 The Hollywood Years by MGM RecordsFirst up is this review of the UK version of the 1962 release, “The Judy Garland Story Vol 2 – The Hollywood Years!“, which is the first time the label released some of Judy’s pre-soundtrack album performances taken directly from the film soundtracks.  Included was the premier release of Judy’s prerecording of “You Can’t Get A Man With A Gun” from Annie Get Your Gun (1950) recorded in 1949.  Another outtake was included with no explanation that it was an outtake, “Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen,” cut from 1938’s Love Finds Andy Hardy.  As the reviewer notes:  Judy Garland’s version – a winner – of You Can’t Get a Man With a Gun is released for the first time in a new volume of The Judy Garland Story.  The song is one of several Judy recorded in 1950 when she was cast in the leading role in Annie Get Your Gun.  Unfortunately, Judy could not complete the film.  This was the only official release of any of Judy’s “Annie” recordings until Rhino Records released 

Judy Garland - MGM Records "Metro" labelIn 1965 MGM Records released another Garland compilation on their “Metro” label, simply titled “Judy Garland.”  This time the LP was in “stereo.”  The recordings used were all in mono but the label “electronically enhanced” them to create a stereo sound on a stereo LP made for stereo styluses.  The effect sounded more like they increased the bass in one channel and the treble in another, adding some echo to balance it out.  Over the years the label released these stereo enhanced recordings as well as the mono versions.

Check out The Judy Garland Discography’s “Soundtracks” pages for information about all of these MGM Records compilations as well as all of the various releases of Judy Garland soundtracks over the years.


 

April 25, 1963:  I Could Go On Singing was playing in a theater near you!

spacer

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s